TGIF! Jan 12 2018

TGIF!

 This week we are going back and forth with the state regarding fire safety inspections on our potential location.  More news once we have something definitive to share.  Keep those fingers and toes crossed for us!

Here are a couple of stories we highlighted on our Facebook page this week:

Real World Contributions

We’ve featured Idaho’s One Stone before, but this story highlights how their students are leading design thinking sessions for local businesses – and totally holding their own teaching adults twice their age.

“There is no longer a ‘gentleman’s C’”

Edutopic highlights examples from around the US that we may be seeing the end of 100 years of letter grading.  Transcripts are starting to change, and this move to competency-based learning “gets kids focused on doing their personal best on meeting or exceeding standards rather than getting a better grade than the kid next to them.”

In closing….

Thanks for your continued interest and support.  As we roll into 2018, is there something you’d like to see us write about in a future TGIF?   Hit “reply” and give me your suggestion!

Kim

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TGIF! Jun 23 2017

TGIF!

Happy third day of summer… yes, the days are now officially getting shorter! (But hopefully that helps those with younger kids get them to bed a bit earlier.)

Can high school be more than the sum of its programming?

You may have seen the paper on Tuesday announcing a new partnership for manufacturing education at Grand Haven High School.  There was a quote near the end of the article which said “the P.R.I.M.E. partnership will provide students with another opportunity to succeed and find their passion.”  At Imagine!, we talk a lot about students finding their path in life, and on the surface this sounds similar to GHHS’s goals.  But the difference between our educational models isn’t in the “What” that we respectively offer, it’s in the “Why” and the “How” we each do it.  Grand Haven has an internship program, a co-op program, an early-college program, a CTE program, and now a manufacturing program (not to mention the “regular” college prep program and for good measure, a credit-recovery program.)  What a menu!  But there are three gaps in how these are implemented that prevent these learning opportunities from truly allowing students to find their path.  The first is that these programs “dabble”.  In most cases, they don’t begin until 11th grade; in most cases, they are a limited part of the school day (one or two periods or perhaps a half day at best).   Why do they merely dabble?  Because of the second reason – these programs add, but never subtract.  All (or nearly all) of the traditionally taught classes must still be taken.  The clear majority of time is dedicated to the traditional model; only when the traditional credits earned in the traditional way are met, is there time to do other things.  The third and final gap is the lack of personal guidance and feedback.  Attending an information night on a specialized program and then signing up for it at course selection time, or perhaps having a 15-minute advising session with a guidance counselor to whom you are one of a 400+ student caseload, is minimally helpful to figuring out who you are and what you want to do in life.

At Imagine!, our vision is to support students as they gain the knowledge and experience to construct (for themselves!) a life of meaning and purpose.  It’s all based on design thinking – a supportive, iterative process of trying things out, reflecting on them, and then deciding how to adjust course and what experiences, development, and learning are needed next.  When you then align your educational model to that vision, everything about the school experience changes.  And the prominence of relationships, the use of time, and the commitment to putting each student at the center of their own learning change everything for the learner.

Other schools in our area are innovating by adding to the menu. (It’s the Golden Corral, now with unlimited shrimp!)

We’re aiming for a wholly different dining experience. 😉

Learning Links

I posted the first of several “learning spark” videos on our Facebook page this week.  Head on over there to check out a video from High Tech High on how they change the classroom and expectations that students think for themselves – starting on Day 1 of ninth grade.  Please leave a comment sharing your thoughts!  (Not a Facebook user? You can access the video directly here.)

In closing….

Thanks – as always – for taking time in your day to read this newsletter.  Are there any topics you’d like to see covered over the next few weeks? Drop me a line and let me know!

Kim